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My mom was a total perfectionist, to the extent that nothing was ever perfect, AND the stress involved took away some of her enjoyment of the event, the moment, the meaning, etc. I learned early on that being perfect wasn't the bullseye. Then when I heard Brugh Joy said it is our imperfections that make us perfectly ourselves. Thank you for bringing this wisdom through to us in the way that you did, so thoroughly, and with such insight into stepping with it forward!

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Yes! that would have been such useful advice as a young person. I too grew up with the story that failure was not an option, which generated enormous shame and unworthiness when failure inevitably showed up on my path. My 'personality drugs' became perfectionism and safety - both of which lead to a restrictive life and fear of taking risks. I wish we taught these self-awareness skills to kids in high school instead of filling their heads with algebra!

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Ann - Your insight into the Professor's topic was important especially for those who rarely look at their problems with the view to learn and continue moving forward. I am particularly lucky that normal dinner table conversation when I was growing up included daily issues that of course included failures. Those were opportunities for both my parents to instill the idea that they weren't fatal... and in fact, were a daily lesson in life. A topic I continually incorporate in my novels.

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Samuel Beckett said “Try. Fail. Try again. Fail . Fail better.

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Are you asking me what he meant or what my 'personality drug' is. What he meant is in the text. Not sure what mine is, but not sure I would tell in any case. He didn't!

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“What is your personality drug?” A clarifying question.

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Hi Ann, Thanks for the like. I liked what you posted too. Thanks. Suzanne

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